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Inverkeithing
High School

History

Welcome to the History Department!

Below you will find information about the S3 Course, National 5, Higher and Advanced Higher History. You will also be able to view photos from the various trips we run.

 

 STAFF LIST

Mr Connor

Miss McAllister

Miss McMenemy

Mrs Renfrew

 

Potential Career Paths:

Journalism

Law

Politics

Tourism

Teaching

The Arts

Civil Service

The Armed Forces

Business/Finance

 

 

 

 

S3 COURSE OUTLINE:

S3 HISTORY

History is the study of people and the past, we look at what has happened in the past and how that impacts on our lives. Pupils study 3 units which cover The Scottish Wars of Independence, The Rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis and Scotland and the Great War.

 

Entry to the Course

Pupils should have a real interest in the course and a passion for History. They should be aware that the course will encourage them to develop their curiosity of the past.

 

Assessments

The course is made up of multiple assessments –

  • There will be a variety of assessments that will assess the progress that the pupils are making. These are designed to allow the pupils the opportunity to display their learning and progress in the subject. Each unit will have an end of unit assessment this allows the pupils the opportunity to develop their revision skills which will be essential for future learning.
  • There will also be more bespoke assessments that will encourage pupils to be creative and display their learning in the form of information boards, powerpoints, newspaper articles etc.

  

 Units Studied

  • The Scottish Wars of Independence is a study of the period when Scotland entered massive conflict with the English following the death of Alexander III in Fife. Following on from this moment Scotland was bordering war until the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. We will explore the events that occurred and reflect on how they impacted the Scottish Nation.
  • The rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party is a reflection of a key part in recent world history where the brutality of man towards man was clearly evidenced for the world to see. It is essential that the pupils have an understanding of this to develop compassion and empathy for those who lived through the regime. We will also consider how such a world has impacted on the world that we now live in.
  • Scotland and the Great War is a study of the experiences of Scots in the Great War and its impact on life in Scotland. This topic considers the impact of technology on the soldiers on the Western Front. It also considers the way in which the war changed life for people at home as the war began to impact on every aspect of life both during and after the war.

 

Skills Developed

  • Being able to explain key factors relating to the units studied
  • Demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the content studied
  • Evaluating the usefulness of a source in relation to the topics that we are covering.
  • Working in groups
  • Researching and being able to identify trustworthy sources from online
  • Forming logical answers that take consideration of different sides of History and coming to a reasoned conclusion.

 

Home Learning

To do well in History it is essential to have a good knowledge about what has happened in the world in the past. We encourage all of our pupils to be curious with sources of information and to watch relevant documentaries to enhance their experience and enjoyment of History. Some other good opportunities include –

  • Visiting the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh – this is free, however it is recommended to book your visit in advance (https://www.nms.ac.uk/national-museum-of-scotland/)
  • Discussing at home learning that has taken place over the course of the week or day will also allow and encourage the pupils to develop their confidence and have a greater understanding of the materials that they are learning.

 

Progression

With a strong Level 4 award in S3 pupils will be able to move into National 5 History to continue their studies in History.

 

Trips

There will be an opportunity to attend the Belgium Battlefields trip which takes place every year in the May of the year. More information will follow regarding this.

There will also be an excursion to the Bannockburn visitor centre for all S3 pupils to see how the battle was executed in 1314.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NATIONAL 5 HISTORY

 

History is the study of people and the past, we look at what has happened in the past and how that impacts on our lives. Pupils study 3 units which cover Scotland and the Great War, The Atlantic Slave Trade and Free At Last (American Civil Rights)

 

Entry to the Course

It would be expected that pupils either progress from Level 4 in S3 or have a National 4 pass in Modern Studies or another social subject.  

 

Assessment

The course is made up of 2 different assessments –

  • Exam (80 marks/80%): pupils have 2 hours and 20 minutes to answer 3 sections – 1 for each unit they study. Within each section there are 3 knowledge and understanding questions which are worth either 4, 6, or 9 marks. These allow pupils to show what knowledge they have learned. There is also a skills question in each section. The 3 skills are: evaluating the usefulness of a source, source comparison, and exploring how fully a source describes or explains an event in History. Each of these questions includes at least 1 source of information and pupils will engage with these sources before writing their answers.

 

  • Assignment (20/20%): pupils select a Historical issue, create their own question, and research independently to find the answers to help them answer their own question. They will then organise this research and select what information is going to be relevant to their essay. Their essay will need and introduction, middle section and a clear conclusion. This essay is written up under exam conditions in 1 hour in November/December.

 

 

 Units Studied

  • Scotland and the Great War is a study of the experiences of Scots in the Great War and its impact on life in Scotland. This topic considers the impact of technology on the soldiers on the Western Front. It also considers the way in which the war changed life for people at home as the war began to impact on every aspect of life both during and after the war.
  • The Atlantic Slave Trade is a study of the nature of the British Atlantic slave trade in the late eighteenth century, changing attitudes towards it in Britain and the pressures that led to its abolition, illustrating the themes of rights, exploitation and culture.
  • Free at last is the study of American civil rights and how there was a definite change in attitude between white and black Americans. There was a growth in racist organisations who attempted to disrupt and stop America from Integrating. This period allows us to reflect on the treatment of humans by other humans and see how society dealt with the changes.

 

Skills Developed

  • Being able to explain key factors relating to the units studied
  • Demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the content studied
  • Evaluating the usefulness of a source in relation to the topics that we are covering.
  • Working in groups
  • Researching and being able to identify trustworthy sources from online
  • Forming logical answers that take consideration of different sides of History and coming to a reasoned conclusion.

 

Home Learning

To do well in History it is essential to have a good knowledge about what has happened in the world in the past. We encourage all of our pupils to be curious with sources of information and to watch relevant documentaries to enhance their experience and enjoyment of History. Some other good opportunities include –

  • Visiting the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh – this is free, however it is recommended to book your visit in advance (https://www.nms.ac.uk/national-museum-of-scotland/)
  • Discussing at home learning that has taken place over the course of the week or day will also allow and encourage the pupils to develop their confidence and have a greater understanding of the materials that they are learning.

 

Progression

With a pass at National 5 History pupils can continue their studies at Higher level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIGHER HISTORY

 

The Higher History Course allows learners to acquire breadth and depth in their knowledge and understanding of the past through the study of Scottish, British, European and world contexts in a variety of time periods.

 

The topics taught at Higher level are:

  • British: Britain, 1851-1951
  • European & World: Germany, 1815-1939
  • Scottish: Migration & Empire, 1830-1939

 

Entry to the Course

It would be expected that to complete Higher History you would have achieved the National 5 History course (A-C).

 

Assessment

The Exam

Paper 1 – British, European & World History (44 marks)

Learners will have 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete this paper and need to answer a total of two extended responses (essays); one from the British area of study and one from the European & World history section. Each essay is worth 22 marks each.

 

Paper 2 – Scottish History (36 marks)

Learners will have 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete this paper and need to answer a total of four questions broadly based on the use of historical sources including; evaluating the usefulness of sources, explaining events or developments, deciding how fully a source explains an event and interpreting the viewpoints of two different sources.

 

The Assignment

The assignment is worth 30 marks. In the research stage, learners choose a topic, question or issue which allows them to analyse and evaluate a historical issue. They research the issue, and organise their findings to address the topic, using the History resource sheet to collate their evidence and references. Learners then have 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete the production of evidence for assessment in one sitting.

 

Skills Development

Learners in higher history will develop a range of skills including:

 

Essay Writing

  • Writing an introduction to an essay which provides background, identifies key factors and sets a clear line of argument.
  • Providing detailed knowledge in an essay to support the main factors being discussed.
  • Analysing factors in an essay by explaining their impact, consequences or exploring strengths and limitations.
  • Evaluating the importance of a single factor in relation to the question.
  • Evaluating the importance of different factors to build a sustained line of argument.
  • Writing a conclusion to an essay which provides an overall judgment and supporting evidence.

Source Skills

  • Deciding how fully a source explains an event by making a judgement, interpreting information from the source and adding accurate and relevant recall.
  • Evaluating the origin, purpose, content and context of historical sources. using COWPAT.
  • Interpret information by identifying and explaining the differing viewpoints presented by two sources.
  • Explaining an event or development..

Transferable Skills

  • Critical Thinking
  • Independence/ Team Work
  • Research/ Investigation
  • Debate
  • Communication
  • Presentation

And many more!

 

Progression Routes

  • Advanced Higher History
  • Further study, employment and/or training

 

  

  

 

ADVANCED HIGHER HISTORY

 

The Advanced Higher History Course allows learners to acquire depth in their knowledge and understanding of historical themes and further develop the skills of analysing complex historical issues, evaluating sources and drawing conclusions. The depth of study enables learners to engage in historical debate and thereby develop a deeper appreciation of the forces which have shaped historical developments. 

  

Entry to the Course

It would be expected that to complete Advanced Higher History you would have achieved the Higher History course (A-C).

 

Course Content

The topic taught at Advanced Higher level is:

  • Russia: From Tsarism to Stalinism, 1914-45

 

Historical Study

Learners undertake a detailed study of a single historical period. Through this study they develop their ability to evaluate a wide range of historical sources which have some complex features, taking into account their provenance, content and historical and historiographical contexts. Learners engage with the views of a range of historians, analyse issues to sustain a coherent line of argument, and draw well-reasoned conclusions supported by detailed evidence.

 

Researching Historical Issues

Learners develop skills of:

  • Justifying appropriate research issues.
  • Planning a complex programme of research.
  • Researching, collating and recording information.
  • Explaining approaches to organising.
  • Presenting and referencing findings.
  • Using an appropriate referencing convention.

 

Assessment

The Exam

Question Paper (90 marks) 3 hours

 

Part A: Historical Issues (50 marks)

 Learners will need to answer a total of two extended responses (essays) from a choice of five, requiring learners to draw on the skills, knowledge and understanding they have acquired during the course. Each essay is worth 25 marks each.

 

Part B: Historical Sources (40 marks)

Learners will need to answer a total of three extended response questions, requiring learners to use the skills, knowledge and understanding they have acquired during the course and apply these to unseen historical sources. These include; evaluating the usefulness of sources, interpreting sources and placing them in their historical context and interpreting the viewpoints of two different sources.

 

The Dissertation (50 marks)

The dissertation enables learners to demonstrate their skills, knowledge and understanding by undertaking independent research into a complex historical issue. This is completed throughout the year and submitted prior to the Easter break.

 

Skills Development

Learners in Advanced Higher history will develop a range of skills including:

  • A conceptual understanding of the past and an ability to think independently.
  • A critical analysis of existing historical research, including identifying important lines of argument and evaluating schools of thought on particular historical issues.
  • Analytical skills through the use of historical sources relating to authorship and purpose, perspective and historical and historiographical context.
  • An understanding of the relationship between factors that contribute to complex historical events.
  • An understanding of the impact of contributing factors, and their relationship with one another, on historical events.
  • Synthesis through the use of primary sources and perspectives from historical research to analyse complex historical issues and sustain coherent lines of argument.
  • skills to adopt a relevant and structured approach to researching a historical issue, drawing conclusions in a clear and well-reasoned way, while reflecting the complexity of the issue and the limitations of the available evidence.

  

Progression Routes

  • Degree courses in social subjects and social sciences or related areas.
  • Further study, employment and/or training.

 

Potential Career Paths

  • Journalism
  • Law
  • Politics
  • Tourism
  • Teaching
  • The Arts
  • Civil Service
  • The Armed Forces
  • Business/Finance