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Inverkeithing
High School

Business EducATION

Welcome to the Inverkeithing High School Business Education Page!

 

The Business Education Faculty at Inverkeithing High School is made up of subjects including Business Management, Business Administration and IT, and finally Computing.

We all passionately believe Business Education plays an important part in the world we live in today and we aim to provide holistic learning experience to help prepare our young people for the future. We want learning to be fun and we work hard to ensure that all learners can achieve success and find appropriate challenge. We have a strong record of attainment in the senior school and are committed to supporting all of our learners to achieve the qualification that is right for them.

 

Staff List:

Mr Connor (PTC Business, Computing and Maths)

 Ms Russell

Miss Duff

Mr Gilchrist

Mr Johnstone

 

 COURSE OUTLINES:

S2 BUSINESS AND COMPUTING

 

The purpose of the combined Business / Computing course is to provide our S2 learners with the opportunity to develop a wide range of digital literacy skills that will underpin and support their knowledge and understanding in order to prepare them for different courses that they may choose to study in S3 and beyond. 

An example of tasks you will complete is listed below:

 

 

S3 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND COMPUTING

 

S3 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT:

The aim of this course is to provide pupils with a broad experience of Enterprise, IT and Business skills. The course will also provide a basis for progression into National 4/5 Business Management.

 

Content

Business Education will help to develop students personally - they will be expected to work with others, make presentations, research information, produce documentation and evaluate their work so that everything is up to a business standard. Students will use IT throughout the course, enabling them to expand their skills as they select the appropriate software mentioned above, including the Internet, e-mail and the electronic diary to support business and entrepreneurial activities.

Topics may include the following:

Why do businesses exist, Sectors of industry, Customer needs and wants, Goods and services, Factors of production, Business support, Types of organisation, Stakeholders and finance.

Assessment

Knowledge and skills will be assessed in different ways, depending on the topic being studied. This may include organising an event - planning all the necessary tasks, then preparing and organising all the resources needed. Another type of assessment may be working in a team to come up with and develop a business idea. These would be interspersed with investigation work, project work, classroom tests, and assessed work/homework. Pupils will undertake self and peer evaluation of classwork and use assessment to judge progress towards their targets.

 

 

S3 COMPUTING SCIENCE:

The course aims to develop your understanding of the role Computing Science plays in our everyday lives; shaping the world we live in and influencing the future of our society.

 

Content

The course will enable you to develop the practical skills and confidence to embrace and use technology. You will also extend your knowledge and understanding of how hardware devices operate and how to design and create software applications and digital solutions to solve problems.

Topics may include the following:

Web design, data representation – binary, image calculations, Networks, Environmental Impact, Computational thinking, Python Programming, Film editing, Databases, Security, 3D Modelling

Assessment

End of Unit theory assessment

Folio of work to showcase practical skills.

End of course assessment

 

NATIONAL 4 / 5 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

 

National 4/5 Business Management:

The S4 course in Business Management offers an array of topics which focus on the dynamic business world. These topics are outlined below:

 

Understanding business

Candidates are introduced to the business environment while developing skills, knowledge and understanding of enterprise, and the role of different types of business organisations in society. They also learn about the internal and external environments in which organisations operate, and the role of stakeholders in business.

Management of marketing

Candidates develop skills, knowledge and understanding of the importance to organisations of having effective marketing systems. They learn about the processes and procedures organisations use to maintain competitiveness, and how marketing can be used to communicate effectively with consumers, maximising customer satisfaction.

 Management of operations

Candidates develop skills, knowledge and understanding of the importance to organisations of having effective operations systems. They learn about the processes and procedures used to maintain quality through the effective management of suppliers, inventory, and methods of production in an ethical manner.

Management of people

Candidates develop skills, knowledge and understanding of the issues facing organisations when managing people. They learn about the theories, concepts and processes relating to human resource management, and how employees contribute to the success of organisations.

Management of finance

Candidates develop skills, knowledge and understanding of the issues facing organisations when managing finance. They learn about the basic theories, concepts and processes relating to financial aspects of business, when preparing and interpreting information to solve financial problems facing organisations.

 

METHODOLOGY

We use teacher-led discussion, cooperative group work and many formative assessment strategies to give pupils the opportunity to demonstrate and improve their knowledge, practical skills and skills for learning, life and work.

 

ASSESSMENT

Pupils are formally assessed using SQA assessment resources.

At National 4 level there are two units of work which are assessed by one formal assessment per unit. We also issue homework which covers each unit of work. This homework is graded as a percentage and is considered as part of the assessment of the course. All pupils will complete an added value unit at National 4 level. There is no final examination for National 4 level.

At National 5 level there are three units of work which are assessed by two formal assessments per unit. We also issue homework which covers each unit of work. This homework is graded as a percentage and is a vital part of the course as it helps to develop the answering techniques which are required for successful attainment at National 5 level. National 5 pupils will complete an added value unit at National 4 level and then a further added value unit at National 5 which forms part of the SQA final qualification result. The final exam comprises a question paper (70 marks) and an added value unit (30 marks).

 

NATIONAL 4 / 5 - COMPUTING SCIENCE

 

NATIONAL 4 COMPUTING SCIENCE:

COURSE OUTLINE:

The National 4 Computing Science Course builds on the work done in S3 Computing Science. As well as engaging pupils in problem-solving activities and providing them with a wide range of practical IT experiences, it also provides opportunities to enhance their literacy and numeracy skills.

The course consists of two units – Information Systems Design and Development and Software Design and Development.

 

METHODOLOGY

Teacher-led discussion and cooperative group work are used to give pupils the opportunity to demonstrate and improve their knowledge, understanding and practical skills throughout the course.

 

ASSESSMENT

Information Systems Design and Development has two outcomes which are assessed at appropriate times during the course.  The first outcome involves developing a simple information system, a website, using appropriate development tools.  The second outcome is a written report which considers the factors involved in the design and implementation of an information system.

Software Design and Development has two outcomes which are also assessed at appropriate times.  The outcomes are combined into tasks which involve developing short programs featuring a range of data types and constructs, using Livecode, and providing simple explainations of how programs work.

As there is no external examination for the National 4 course, there is no need for pupils to undertake additional end-of-topic tests to re-inforce their knowledge and understanding of the concepts.  There is, however, a Value Added Unit that must be satisfactorily completed.  This unit encompasses elements of both Information Systems Design and Development and Software Design and Development.

 

 

NATIONAL 5 COMPUTING SCIENCE:

The National 5 Computing Science Course builds on the work done in S3 Computing Science. As well as engaging pupils in problem-solving activities and providing them with a wide range of practical IT experiences, it also provides opportunities to enhance their literacy and numeracy skills.

Database design and development
This unit allows pupils to develop knowledge and an understanding of the analysis, design, implementation, testing and evaluation stages of creating a database.
Pupils will study linked database tables and the terms used to describe its components.
Pupils will create databases using the software FileMaker Pro.  

Web Design and development
This unit allows pupils to develop knowledge and an understanding of the analysis, design, implementation, testing and evaluation stages of creating a website.
Pupils will study the types of media files used for web pages and why compression is needed
Pupils will create their own web pages using the programming languages HTML and Javascript.

Software Development and Design
This unit allows pupils to develop knowledge and an understanding of the analysis, design, implementation, testing and evaluation stages of creating effective programs.
Pupils will create their own code using a programming languages called Livecode.

Computer Systems
This unit allows pupils to develop knowledge and an understanding of how a computer works.
Pupils will learn how:

computer usage affects the environmentand security precauctions are used to prevent computer crime.

 

METHODOLOGY

Teacher-led discussion and cooperative group work are used to give pupils the opportunity to demonstrate and improve their knowledge, understanding and practical skills throughout the course.

 

ASSESSMENT

Pupils undertake an online test at the end of the following topics/units:

Unit 1 –Data Representation

Unit 2 – Computer Architechture and Languages

Unit 3 – Databases

Unit 4 – Web Design

Unit 5 – Software Development and Design

There will be a written Prelim in January.

Practical work will be assessed in February using an assignment, sent from the SQA,  that encompasses elements of the Database Design and Development Unit, the Web Design and Development Unit and the Software Design and Development.  This will take place during class time and is worth 31% of the pupil’s final mark.

 

HIGHER COURSES - 

HIGHER BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

The topics studied within this Higher Business Management course include five areas of study:
Understanding business
Candidates develop their understanding of how large organisations in the private, public and third sectors operate, make decisions and pursue their strategic goals. They analyse the impact that internal and external environments have on an organisation’s activity, and consider the implications of these factors.
Management of marketing
Candidates develop their understanding of the importance of effective marketing systems to large organisations. They learn about the relevant theories, concepts and procedures used by organisations to improve competitiveness and customer satisfaction.
Management of operations
Candidates develop their understanding of the importance of effective operations systems to large organisations. They learn about the relevant theories, concepts and procedures used by organisations to improve and/or maintain quality, and the importance of satisfying both internal and external customers’ needs.
Management of people
Candidates develop their understanding of the issues that large organisations face when managing people. They learn about the relevant theories, concepts and procedures used by organisations when dealing with staff, including retention, training, leadership and motivation.
Management of finance
Candidates develop their understanding of the issues that large organisations face when managing finance. They learn about the relevant theories, concepts and procedures used by organisations in financial situations
 

ASSESSMENT:

EXAM - 90 MARKS

ASSIGNMENT - 30 MARKS

 

USEFUL LINKS:

 https://www.brightredbooks.net/subjects/higherbusiness || https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zw26n39

https://scholar.hw.ac.uk/vle/scholar/session.controller?action=viewCourse&ID=F030FBA6-880F-28D0-EE93-109B532F4323

 

 HIGHER BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION & IT

 

The topics studied within this Higher Administration and IT course include:

  • Role of Administrative Assistant
  • Time and task management
  • Effective teams
  • Workplace legislation
  • Impact of digital technology
  • Customer care
  • Organising meetings and events
  • Appropriate methods of communication and research
  • Word Processing
  • Spreadsheets
  • Relational databases
  • Presentations
  • Communication

 

ASSESSMENT:

EXAM PAPER - 50 MARKS

The question paper has a total mark allocation of 50 marks. This is 42% of the overall marks for the course assessment. The question paper has two sections containing questions that sample from the ‘Skills, knowledge and understanding for the course assessment’ detailed in this document. Candidates must answer all questions. Section 1 is worth 10 marks and contains of a set of questions based on a piece of stimulus material. The questions generally relate to the stimulus, although some questions may be based on topics surrounding the stimulus material. They assess problem solving, the application of knowledge and understanding, and may range in value from 1–6 marks. Section 2 is worth 40 marks and contains questions that assess the application of knowledge and understanding. Questions may range in value from 1–6 marks

ASSIGNMENT - 70 MARKS

The assignment gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate: Using advanced functions in word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation software to produce, process and manage information, and solve problems in unfamiliar contexts. Electronic research skills to source complex information. Effective communication skills, taking account of context, purpose and audience.

The assignment has a total mark allocation of 70 marks. This is 58% of the overall marks for the course assessment.

 

Useful Links            

https://www.brightredbooks.net/subjects/higheradminit

 

HIGHER COMPUTING SCIENCE

 

The course introduces candidates to an advanced range of computational processes, where they learn to apply a rigorous approach to the design and development process across a variety of contemporary contexts. They also gain an awareness of the important role that computing professionals play in meeting the needs of society today and for the future.

The course enables candidates to:

  • Develop and apply aspects of computational thinking in a range of contemporary contexts.
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of advanced concepts and processes in computing science.
  • Apply skills and knowledge in analysis, design, implementation, testing and evaluation to a range of digital solutions with some complex aspects.
  • Communicate advanced computing concepts and explain computational behaviour clearly and concisely, using appropriate terminology.
  • Develop awareness of current trends in computing technologies and their impact in transforming and influencing our environment and society.

 

The course has four areas of study:

Software design and development

Candidates develop knowledge and understanding of advanced concepts and practical problem-solving skills in software design and development. They do this by using appropriate modular software development environments. Candidates develop modular programming and computational-thinking skills by analysing, designing, implementing, testing, and evaluating practical solutions and explaining how these programs work. They use their knowledge of data types and constructs to create efficient programs to solve advanced problems.

 

Computer systems

Candidates develop their understanding of how data and instructions are stored in binary form and factors affecting system performance. They gain an awareness of the environmental impact of intelligent systems, as well as the security risks, precautions and laws that can protect computer systems.

 

Database design and development

Candidates develop knowledge, understanding and advanced practical problem-solving skills in database design and development. They do this through a range of practical tasks, using a minimum of three linked tables and implemented in SQL. Candidates apply computational thinking skills to analyse, design, implement, test, and evaluate practical solutions, using a range of development tools. Candidates apply interpretation skills to tasks involving some complex features in both familiar and new contexts.

 

Web design and development

Candidates develop knowledge, understanding and advanced practical problem-solving skills in web design and development. They do this through a range of practical and investigative tasks. Candidates apply computational-thinking skills to analyse, design, implement, test, and evaluate practical solutions to web-based problems, using a range of development tools including HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript. Candidates apply interpretation skills to tasks involving some complex features in both familiar and new contexts.

ASSESSMENT:
Exam Paper - 110 marks
The question paper has a total mark allocation of 110 marks.
This is 69% of the overall marks for the course assessment.
Marks are distributed across all four areas of study:
Assignment - 50 marks
The assignment has a total mark allocation of 50 marks.
This is 31% of the overall marks for the course assessment.
The assignment has three distinct tasks, with marks distributed across the following areas of study:

HIGHER ACCOUNTING

Accounting is an important function in many organisations. Effective accounting procedures provide essential information to management, helping organisations perform successfully. This course will provide you with the skills to produce, interpret and analyse financial information and to evaluate business performance.  The course combines both the practical and theoretical aspects of learning related to accounting, and you will also develop the digital technology skills that aid accounting and decision-making tasks.

What will I learn?

You will be learning how to:

Is it for me?

You will enjoy this subject if:

Learners with no prior experience of accounting or business are very welcome, but strong numeracy skills are needed and learners should have (or be expecting) at least National 5 Mathematics – Grade A or B

Employment options

There are many career choices where a knowledge and understanding of Accounting would be of benefit and some where it is essential.  Accountants, Actuaries, Auditors, Business Managers, Data Analysts, Economists, Management Consultants, Mortgage & Financial Advisors & Stockbrokers all rely on Accounting.

 

 

ADVANCED HIGHER BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

 

The course aims to enable candidates to:

 

Course content

The course has three areas of study:

The external business environment

Candidates develop a detailed knowledge and in-depth understanding of the effects of external influences on organisations operating at a multinational and global level. They gain an in-depth understanding of current issues affecting organisations in an economic, social and environmental context, and consider the effectiveness of various courses of action.

 

The internal business environment

Candidates expand their knowledge of both traditional and contemporary management theories used by organisations to maximise efficiency, and evaluate theories relating to internal factors that influence the success of teams.

 

Evaluating business information

Candidates develop skills in evaluating a range of business information used by organisations to reach conclusions.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Course assessment is based on the information in this course specification.

The course assessment meets the purposes and aims of the course by addressing:

 

This enables candidates to:

 

 

Course assessment structure: Question paper

Question paper 80 marks

The question paper gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to:

 

The question paper has a total mark allocation of 80 marks. This is 67% of the overall marks for the course assessment.

It has two sections:

Section 1 -  is worth 40 marks and has a set of mandatory questions based on stimulus material in the form of a business case study. It is based on a large, real-life organisation and may include any combination of text, financial information, graphs, diagrams, charts and images. Each question ranges in value from 2-8 marks and is drawn from across the course. Questions assess breadth, application, and challenge, within the context of the case study.

Section 2 - is worth 40 marks and has four mandatory questions, worth 10 marks each. Questions may have one or more parts, each ranging in value from 2-10 marks and are drawn from across the course. Questions assess breadth, application, and challenge.

 

Course assessment structure:  Project

Project - 40 marks

The project gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to: